Publication Date

1997

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

First Advisor

Geremie Sawadogo

Abstract

AIDS is pandemic. Prevention has become the focus for many non-governmental organizations. There is a growing need for culturally appropriate AIDS education. AIDS was diagnosed in the west and early prevention campaigns targeted specific 'at risk' populations. These and other western biases still exist in AIDS education strategies. AIDS is spreading, at dramatic rates in the developing world. Western educational strategies cannot provide effective AIDS education in these settings. This thesis considers the impact religion, in this case, Islam, has on AIDS education, specifically relating to women in Bambey, Senegal. Women and religious leaders were interviewed to determine their opinions on women's role in society, religion, and their access to AIDS education. The interview results and a Global AIDS Education framework were used to analyze the current AIDS education plan in Bambey. Based on the analysis and the writer's personal experiences; several recommendations are offered to modify the current plan and move towards more effective AIDS education in Bambey.

Disciplines

International Public Health | Public Health Education and Promotion

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