Title

An Appreciative Inquiry of Volunteerism: A Case Study of Individual’s Volunteering for an NGO in Granada, Nicaragua

Publication Date

8-17-2008

Degree Name

MA in Intercultural Service, Leadership, and Management

First Advisor

Paul Ventura

Abstract

Within organizations that utilize volunteers, efforts are not always made to fully understand the core impact that the volunteer experience has on the individual. Many times volunteers are funneled in and out of organizations and no accurate information is gathered on their true feelings and opinions of the experience. If efforts were consistently made to accomplish this, it is my belief that an organization would have a more concrete plan of recruitment, retention, monitoring and evaluation of their volunteers. As a result, an organization could operate more efficiently and effectively if the volunteer’s true worldview and reflections were obtained. These realizations led me to address the following research question for my Capstone: What is the core impact of the volunteer’s experience on the volunteer? The sub-questions are the following: How did the individual develop his/ her worldview of volunteerism? What differences and similarities exist within individuals’ volunteer experiences? Even though this Capstone has focused on volunteers within an education and community development focused international organization, La Esperanza Granada (LEG); the process and data gathered through utilizing a case study approach by administering qualitative interviews may be appropriate to that of other organizations seeking similar information in hopes to uncover challenges and provide solutions. This Capstone has presented conclusions and has offered suggestions for the future based on inquiries that determine how an organization could go about searching for these positive, affirming statements from volunteers who have encountered such life changing experiences that have created and shaped their worldview of volunteerism.

Disciplines

Personality and Social Contexts | Psychology | Social Psychology

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